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Jessica Yellin joins The Ascendant Group as the Head of South African Division and exclusive partner in Sub Sahara Africa

The Ascendant Group welcomes Jessica Yellin as Head of South African Division with a role to enhance the firm’s global division

Jessica Yellin

Jessica Whitcutt Yellin, founder of It’s a Shovel, a boutique strategic communications and reputation management consultancy, joins Ascendant Group as the Head of South Africa Division and exclusive partner in Sub Sahara Africa. Yellin comes to Ascendant with 20 years of experience in both agencies and multinational organizations, most recently managing reputation for SABMiller in Africa. Through her role with SABMiller she developed a number of highly successful and award-winning behavior change campaigns. She is passionate about sustainability and is on a mission to change the world by helping a more conscious form of capitalism surface through her unique #ReputationWithPurpose model.

Jessica graduated with a BA in law from the University of Witwatersrand and participated in the SABMiller Corporate Affairs executive development program at the University of Cambridge, Judge Business School. She also passed her MDP from the Gordon Institute of Business Science cum laude.

“I look forward to working with CEO Raoul Davis and the rest of the talented Ascendant team,” Yellin said. “It’s absolutely fantastic that Ascendant was able to expand their global reach to South Africa.”

About Ascendant Group

Since 2004, inspired by trust and built on referrals, Ascendant Group specializes in CEO branding and has delivered significant results for a variety of corporations. Ascendant does that by developing an integrated brand strategy and employing a mix of media outreach, strategic social media, leveraging the likes of LinkedIn, offering award winning design work, securing awards, and even getting book deals with national publishers for their exclusive clientele.  We have also helped broker strategic alliances, producing signature events and negotiating book deals. 

Raoul Davis, CEO of Ascendant Group, explains: “A strong CEO brand in today’s society helps to give emotional staying power to the company in a time when it is harder than ever before to differentiate a company’s services or product amongst the crowd of similar products, fast followers, and even those who will clone quickly.  They want to give their business to a company with a great reputation… and that reputation begins with the person in charge.” 

Ascendant Group Recent Highlights in the Global Division and Publishing World

Our Global Division has been hard at work in 2018, with many new clients and leads from Egypt, Dubai, Lebanon, Europe, and Canada. With offices in Newark and Wilmington, Delaware, Indianapolis, Indiana, and Cairo, Egypt, and a new expansion into the Netherlands, Ascendant Group will look to continue to be the most integrated CEO branding firm in the world.

Ascendant’s clients range from Fortune 500 executives, CEOs of mid-sized companies, retired athletes, and leaders of other organizations including ministries. Headed by Leticia Gomez, Ascendant Entertainment has negotiated book deals with top publishing companies such as Bethany House, a division of Baker House Publishing Group, Thomas Nelson, Harper Collins, Career Press and Penguin Random House to name a few. We continue to work with our clients until we’ve met all metrics.

Ascendant Group welcomes Jessica Yellin joining The Ascendant Group team and bringing her expertise to further our role as a global leader.

Contact Info

Website: https://www.ascendantgroupbranding.com/ascendant-global

Phone: 302.450.4494 ext 202

Email: INFO@ASCENDANTGROUPBRANDING.COM

 

Three Strategies To Capitalize On Cause-Conscious Consumerism

In today’s business climate, where the marketplace is far more socially minded, philanthropy, corporate social responsibility and cause-conscious consumerism are becoming fundamental and even foundational components of daily operations. Both consumers and employees expect companies to not only engage in philanthropy but also be a demonstrable force of change.

Exemplifying this truth is data from EngageForGood.com, which reports that "33% of consumers are now choosing to buy from brands they believe are doing social or environmental good." Data also shows that 72% of consumers have made donations at the cash register and 84% of Americans feel companies have a social responsibility to facilitate change on important issues.

Three Ways To Adopt A Cause-Conscious Model

The following are three worthy strategies to fuse cause-conscious consumerism into your business model.

1. Establish a pricing model aligned with causes that evoke tremendous emotion.

The owners of Nolah Sleep, Daniel Galle and Anna Hjoellund, are making a difference in the mattress industry and the environment by proffering “sleep with a purpose.” The company’s next-generation approach breaks the mold in a myriad of ways, but primarily with its environmentally-friendly Nolah AirFoam mattress.

The product is thoughtfully designed with a type of foam that’s entirely free from harmful substances like ozone depletes, PBDE flame retardants, formaldehyde, phthalates, mercury, lead and other heavy metals.

After launching Nolah, Galle and Hjoellund realized their mattresses were being marked up by traditional retailers as much as 3,000%. So, they began selling exclusively online, becoming a pioneer in the online mattress movement. Nolah Sleep’s “bed-in-a-box” is offered through its website with factory direct pricing, allowing consumers to avoid the outrageous markups. All Nolah mattresses are shipped direct-to-doorstep in an easy-to-handle, eco-friendly cardboard box that reduces packaging volume by a whopping 80% as compared to conventional mattress shipping.

Galle and Hjoellund are also cause-driven, giving back through their “One Nolah Sold Equals One Wildlife Adopted” initiative in partnership with the Defenders of Wildlife organization. As part of the checkout process, each time a Nolah mattress is purchased, the consumer can choose from more than 20 endangered animals — including bald eagles, snowy owls and dolphins — and are then sent an official wildlife adoption certificate as proof that their contribution helped protect American wildlife.

Other entrepreneurs can emulate Nolah by taking a hard look at industry practices and eliminating any factors that come between the consumer and the product that do not add value. Nolah's success is an example of why this type of direct-to-consumer marketing is currently taking retail by storm. Both businesses and customers benefit from lower overhead with businesses enjoying a higher bottom line and customers enjoying lower prices.

Companies can easily incorporate emotion-evoking cause consciousness into their business model by partnering with charitable organizations and building the donation or other support method into the checkout process. Doing this means there is literally zero friction between purchase and donation.

2. Gamify the act of “doing good” to add elements of fun competition.

The charitable online community xocial (pronounced soh-shuhl) is literally making a game out of philanthropy through fun and simple xocial campaigns. Leveraging a concept it refers to as competitive kindness, xocial actually measures each participant's favorable contributions with an XO Score, a calculation representing the direct impact or result of a person’s, team’s and entire company’s xocial campaign.

To initiate a campaign, a company simply sets up a xocial profile page supporting a particular goal or cause of their own choosing. As challenges are completed, points are tallied and a leaderboard is displayed on the company's campaign profile page. Visitors to the page — not just employees, but also customers and potential customers — can see what the company and its employees have accomplished.

With xocial, charitable endeavors are being carried out while companies are demonstrating their commitment to philanthropy. Alternatively, companies can create their own gamification system by incorporating three fundamental components: a points system, badges (or any other tangible token to reward participants as they reach certain benchmarks), and a leaderboard. This system can be adapted for use in support of nearly any type of cause, and can be used internally with employees or can be expanded to include customers.

3. Establish a foundation exemplifying above-and-beyond efforts and intentions.

Scott Petinga has overcome numerous hardships, including a battle with cancer, to enjoy massive success as an entrepreneur and now author of the book No One Ever Drowned in Sweat.

A proponent of B Corp and sustainable philanthropy as a business model, Petinga proves profit and philanthropy can go hand in hand. Businesses and entrepreneurs can do the same by becoming a certified B Corp.

The process involves meeting higher and more rigorous standards in the realms of social and environmental performance, accountability and transparency as set by B Lab, the founding organization behind the B Corps concept. Status as a certified B Corp helps enable businesses to achieve B Lab's stated goal of aspiring to "use the power of markets to solve social and environmental problems."

As Nolah, xocial and Petinga prove, cause-based consumerism is definitely not a fad, but rather a sustainable — and some would even say mission critical — way of doing business today. With the ease and fun with which entrepreneurs and businesses can engage in cause-conscious endeavors, there's absolutely no reason not to be a part of this growing philanthropic movement.

How To Master Your Personal Brand By Thinking Like A CEO

While the term "personal branding" may be thrown around in work circles, do you really know what it means?

Personal branding is essentially is what makes you, you. It’s everything you choose for it to be because you are the one in charge of others' perceptions of it.

A strong brand opens doors, builds a positive reputation in the workplace and helps advance your career. Everyone has a brand, but you must put the time and effort into yours if you want to succeed.

Maintaining a good reputation does not mean perfection. However, it does mean that when you make a mistake (and you will), you acknowledge it and do whatever is necessary to fix it, with genuine humility and hard work. Those who authentically learn from their mistakes and change past habits are the people whose personal brands prosper.

What Does "You, Inc." Mean?

The idea of "You, Inc.," is a concept created by Ines Temple, President and CEO of Lee Hecht Harrison Peru and Chile and author of best-selling book Usted S. A.  In short, it means that we are the CEOs of ourselves and the most important job we have is to sell our brand — or more precisely ourselves — every day. That is why emulating integrity at all times is essential as we move around our different circles of influence. With the combination of social media and offline networking, there is more integration between circles than one might imagine. And who doesn’t want to live a life that is authentic, no matter who you meet or are connecting with? Morally speaking, who are you, really, when you have to keep changing the way you present yourself based on your environment?

Professional ballet dancers understand this concept. They often recite the following mantra: “Always on stage.” They understand the importance of behaving as though they are always in the public eye — they stand up straight and assume that role with confidence.

Our reputation, values, skills, interests and abilities are what we have to offer others. As Ines Temple puts it, it is imperative to “not stop until you find the job you really are passionate about…there is nothing better than enjoying the work.”

Your Role as Your Own CEO

You, as your own personal CEO, must decide what your personal brand is and then take the necessary steps to accomplish those goals. You can’t hire anyone else to be you; instead, you must do the hard work necessary to project a clear picture of who you really are.

Personal branding can be highly successful when the person adopts the attitude that only he, the CEO of himself, can define his personal brand. Here are two quick tips — whether you are an employee or a small business owner — that will help you maximize your personal brand:

Master your temperament

There is nothing more concerning than a person who overreacts. In a professional environment, this can be deadly.  Those who respond to challenges and crisis calmly end up being the ones who succeed.  Crisis PR strategist Rob Weinhold comments in his new book, The Art of Crisis Leadership:  Save Time, Money, Customers, and Ultimately, Your Career, that the problem with most people is they respond to crisis at the same velocity in which it happened. Panicky leaders jeopardize their businesses or their careers. Calm and collected leaders who can undergo a crisis without letting it get the best of them will become the most trustworthy people in the room.

 

Build a network of trusted and successful advisors

Knowing how to manage your contacts and connections is a must. Our network must be developed and constantly updated. We can’t just develop a network of contacts when we need it. If we constantly look after our network, our contacts will speak well of us — not only because we do a good job, but also because we have kept up our end of the bargain in cultivating those relationships. Sometimes, when people become successful, they stop working on their network of contacts. This is a mistake. Always keep in mind that it is essential to build and maintain your networks at all times.

Three Reasons To Develop A Joint Venture

When a company thinks of different avenues to expand its operations, the first thing that comes to mind isn't typically a joint venture. Instead, a company usually considers new marketing initiatives, traditional business development tactics, and cutting costs. However, joint ventures may offer the highest ROI of all.

Firms enter joint ventures for a number of reasons, including accessing difficult markets, reducing the risk of new initiatives, increasing the speed of innovation, and adding new value to existing customers. An intelligent and well executed JV can rapidly bring significant results to your business. Here are three reasons to enter into a JV.

Create A More Compelling Offering

The 2017 Microsoft-GE merger is a prime example of using a JV to increase the speed of innovation. This JV combined Microsoft’s Azure cloud computing platform with GE’s industrial data gathering Predix platform. As a result, GE’s industrial customers recieved access to a new suite of capabilities, making their products far more attractive to customers. And Microsoft had a new edge against larger, more established cloud players like Amazon.

JVs like this can provide a low-cost way to quickly develop new capabilities necessary to serve your clients or better compete with other firms.

Expand Your Reach

When looking to new markets, a JV can give you intimate knowledge of a market without taking the full risk of competing in an unknown environment. For example, global expansion can be difficult when there are significant language barriers and cultural differences, but through a JV it becomes much easier to manage these factors. JV partners can teach you about their market, help you avoid hidden pitfalls, and get you quickly up to speed on how to operate effectively.

Reduce Risk, Including Cost

JVs can also help reduce the costs of expansion. Yijian, the Chinese maker of the innovative artificial intelligence treadmill "Future,” recently created an enormous opportunity for themselves by entering into a JV with U.S.-based TOP JSEN Science & Technology, allowing CEO, Pan Yan Jun, to execute his vision of a healthier world with high quality, low-cost intelligent exercise products.

The company experienced solid growth in China but its goal was always growth in the U.S. Instead of taking on the entire cost of launching into the U.S. on its own, a JV allowed them to take advantage of their partner’s infrastructure, relationships and marketing capabilities. The company launched its groundbreaking treadmill to a new group of consumers around the world, as evidenced by its recent debut at ISPO Munich, and growth has taken off from there. 

If the cost to achieve your goals is prohibitive, using a JV as Yijian did can allow you to take significant steps forward without shouldering the entire cost of the initiative.

The Outcome

A fun, simple example of a JV is when Taco Bell and KFC locations were built together. The venture allowed the restaurants – which are both currently owned by Yum! Brands – to minimize labor cost. While this type of JV was easier to execute because both brands are owned by the same company (PepsiCo at the time of the first dual-brand location), the important takeaway is how two companies were able to bring their best assets together, create synergy and lower their cost. That encapsulates the best reasons for a JV.

However, JVs aren’t right for every situation. You need to weigh the pros and cons and make sure you’ve considered the challenges of collaborating with another organization.

If you decide a JV is right for you, there are a few questions you need to consider: How do your partner’s capabilities complement your own? How will you both define success? What are you offering them in the relationship? The answer to that last question needs to be more than just extra sales. No company wants to feel like an extended sales force of another firm. You need to create a mutually beneficial relationship. If you can effectively answer each of these questions, your company may be ready for a JV.

Four Entrepreneurs Share Insights About Innovation As A Brand Driver

Innovation is a critical driver of many well-known brands. Think about it: If you are not offering something fundamentally new, then how do you plan to get attention?

Creating an innovative product – much less a brand known for innovation – is no easy feat. The most successful companies invest heavily in research and development, viral sharing features, and top education, training and talent. What is important is to walk the talk. Any company can put innovation into their web copy, tagline, or mission statement, but few companies take drastic steps such as frequent innovation training, opening up next to education or learning hubs, or making the investment into top talent to really ensure they stay ahead of the curve.

What are the constituent parts of innovation in your company? Beyond the hype, beyond the claims on the mission statement, what are the fundamental, atomic ingredients that have led to your success? Is it a high concentration of top local talent? VC giants and incubators? An open-minded attitude? Four entrepreneurial businesspeople share their answers are below to give deeper insight into innovation.

Andrey Kunov, Silicon Valley Innovation Center

"Many countries – from Russia to India to Brazil – have tried to create their own version of Silicon Valley and foster innovation, none with the same success. The idea being that if a company is founded in an area ripe for innovation, they too shall become innovative. The Valley has numerous features that make its companies so successful, but no one feature is king. The secret to Valley companies’ success has been that unique combination and openness which drives innovation. The degree to which Valley royalty is willing and encourages failure, the access to education, the access to capital, all of that is what makes it tick. So don’t be afraid to take chances. The way you build your business resume in today’s world is by failing to succeed, so the crazier and riskier an idea seems, the higher its potential reward."

Ishan Puri, Synocate

"Starting your company next to some top schools is a good idea. Building a company near universities exposes you to the vibrant milieu of innovation and talent. Local hackathons, events and meetups can be free marketing and a source of talent. If you can’t be next to a large school, try to have a presence there anyway. The age-old tradition of attending a job fair can lead to some surprising results."

Asim Khaliq, Colligur

"Don’t be afraid to rock the boat, even if it means some potentially serious, disruptive short-term consequences. The first car put a lot of sailors out of business. The first typewriter must have been a bad day for scribes, but does this mean we shouldn’t drive or type? Ten to 20 years later, society rearranges itself for the better. So if your idea creates social or political backlash (a la Uber), bite the bullet and keep pace with history. Controversial disruptors should eventually improve quality of life by ushering in an era of concierge, on-demand, app-based mobile services, from food delivery, to in-home massage and personal training."

Geoff Ladell, Finish Line Floors

"Determination and grit have been the driving factors behind my business. My wife hated me for the first year after I left my comfortable six-figure job to start a company, and two years into it, her fears seemed valid: We were running a $100,000 deficit on the company and facing the potential of bankruptcy. But we stuck to it and by turning it around, created a growing, legacy operation whose clients include some of the biggest universities, hospitals and government agencies in the country. The federal government has been helpful by providing sourcing opportunities for small businesses like ours and through SBA lending programs that make funding more accessible. If you have the option you should try to set up in a place where your local and state government is a good neighbor, with low regulations that allow companies like mine to fail, take risks and pick themselves back up again."

 

How Ego Tanks Branding And Marketing Professionals’ Progress And Jeopardizes Companies

Many different factors can play a role in declining or stalling revenues, and one of the easiest to fix and yet hardest to admit is how much is due to a self-inflicted wound stemming from arrogance, ego and stubbornness. Sometimes the creativity of marketing and branding professionals can go awry. Here are three fixable mistakes branding and marketing leaders make that cost time and money.

1. Trying To Outsmart The Customer

In 2013, BlackBerry reported a $4.4 billion loss for its third quarter sales. The company took six years to design and launch a less expensive phone with apps and a powerful operating system. This allowed Apple and Android to gain significant ground in the meantime.

“The problem wasn’t that we stopped listening to customers,” a BlackBerry insider said. “We believed we knew better what customers needed long term than they did."

The solution lies in understanding human behavior in response to certain factors. Many companies now have "human factor professionals" who study how a new product will be accepted by the user it’s designed for. However, not all companies put the necessary time and effort into hiring someone to help determine the interests and desires of their consumer base, and they instead allow the ego to get in the way. This detrimentally affects sales and can cause an entire company to fail.

Organizations should use the various social media available to learn what consumers are asking for and then follow up with input from consumers. Feedback is crucial and more available than ever with today's technology. Companies that truly take the advice of their consumers in what they want tend to have greater success.

2. Trying To Be The MVP

Brandon Black and Shayne Hughes, authors of Ego Free Leadership: Ending the Unconscious Habits that Hijack Your Businessconducted extensive research to determine mistakes companies make when valuing their own genius over their customers’ preferences. Hughes describes working with a CEO “who was frustrated at not being able to hire strong senior leaders. He realized that his ego wanted to be the guy with the answers, so he never hired anyone who was smarter than he was.”

Almost any company can course-correct with sound leadership. When leaders take the time to listen to their team, they will gain insight they wouldn’t have thought of themselves. When executives take the spotlight of self and share it with others, it serves the entire company well. And team leaders who allow mistakes and build their team up as future leaders tend to raise companies where morale and loyalty are high.

3. Refusing To Change With Market Trends

According to Pearson, increasing sales and gaining popularity in your sector “becomes more complex as technology changes and the world becomes more advanced." Blockbuster really felt the sting of that mistake when it discounted the popularity of Netflix and Redbox.

Blockbuster ignored the signs as customers' behavior let Blockbuster know they were ready to advance with the new technology. Instead of joining the technology age that was advancing, it tried to entice customers with trinkets and sweets, becoming more like a convenience store than a video rental. It was given plenty of input from consumers themselves about what they wanted, yet the retailer failed to listen and filed bankruptcy less than one year later.

Ego doesn’t have to bring a company down as long as leaders understand that their market position isn't bulletproof. Resources like entrepreneur and educator John Assaraf's learning materials, which focus on helping people retrain their neural pathways, and Hughes' and Black's valuable insights shared in their book, can help branding professionals learn how to check their egos and grow their companies' success.

Chiefly, leaders must take into consideration what consumers are expressing as important. While giving in to every fad and trend isn’t necessary or even plausible, doing one’s own research on how a specific trend could impact your product is essential. When customers speak, successful businesses listen and then act appropriately.

 

Tips for successful business in the middle east and asia

With the global business landscape shift that has taken place over the last two decades, you might become a minority in a few years if you own a growing business that doesn’t have an international clientele. If you want to ensure a successful transition into foreign countries, here are a few tips.

Face-to-face communication is preferred.

It's important to attempt to speak with business people in person. The culture in the Middle East and Asia is reliant on trust and friendship.Meeting in person is the only way to build that. Face-to-face interaction is also important because the process of coming to an agreement takes much longer in the region. This results in more time needed to get to know each other personally and professionally. If face-to-face interaction is not possible, the secondary method of communication is a phone call. However, some cultures are averse to negotiating over the phone. In the case that you do need to send written communication, such as an email, it is important to follow up with a phone call. Written communication is considered less important and less personal, meaning you must have people on the ground. Pulling this all off yourself will result in significant travel expenses. Since you're flying cross-continent, you may end up being anxious because you are seeking an ROI which may not allow you to be at your best in building the rapport and being patient in negotiations.

Understand the culture.

Underestanding the local culture is a must. You simply cannot conduct business if you don’t. When speaking to Hassan Hussein, chairman, CEO and managing director of El Taamir Mortgage Finance Company, he said, “Cultures and people are fundamentally different to the point of being, in some cases, opposite. Therefore, understanding the culture of your counterparts is a primary element for building successful personal and professional relationships.” Listen to companies and people in that country and if possible, hire people from that country. Hassan works primarily in the Middle East. When speaking about the culture and how to conduct business here, he said, “The Middle East culture is one that is quite emotional and rests predominantly on trust, and to a certain extent, on compassion. Personal charisma and chemistry are among the key contributors to a healthy, smooth operation in that region. It goes without saying, of course, that business feasibility, profitability and sustainability are still a predetermining element in negotiations. However, trust that is a result of a deep understanding of the ME culture is always an icebreaker and an excellent way to establish a valid proof of concept.”

Get results fast. 

Although "time is money," is a cliché that is often heard in the business world, it is most true in Far East Asia. Today’s professionals are always under high pressure to deliver results of strategic value in weeks, not months. Missed deadlines are considered catastrophic and inexcusable. While you will be pressured to give fast deadlines, it is better to hold your ground and be more conservative. If you miss a deadline, it may result in the end of the relationship.

Consider getting a local partner.

While it may be tempting to hire a marketing expert that possesses market knowledge and relationships with local businesses, you're better off bringing on a strategic partner to help you. Partners want equity; marketing professionals want retainers. A committed partner will be a better investment.

According to Julie Rasmussen, majority owner and chairman of Hertz Russia, “Hire someone who knows the market you are expanding into intimately; preferably someone who speaks the local language in addition to being fluent in both spoken and written English and American business concepts; someone who can bridge the differences in the local market business and social cultures and American business and social cultures; someone who can break through red tape and corporate inertia to get things done and achieve the company’s mission in the market."

Although expanding your business into new foreign markets can be intimidating, it is critical that you keep the above tips in mind. These tips will ensure that you start your expansion on the right track and give you the confidence to conquer the vast landscape that is the global economy.

How to Use CEO Branding to Gain Visibility For Your Company

Most companies fail to leverage one of their most compelling and distinguishable points — the CEO’s brand. CEO branding starts with determining how the CEO's brand relates to the corporate brand and how it can be used to generate access to the target market.

Business isn’t just business-to-consumer (B2C) or business-to-business (B2B) anymore. It is human-to-human (H2H) and is often influential in building trust. When a CEO acts as a thought leader, it provides value to an audience. When done well, CEOs can talk about their businesses during interviews in a more organic sounding and contextual way.

Rebrand yourself in creative ways.

You can rebrand yourself by developing a one-liner that captures who you are in the marketplace. Utilize that single saying — position it in your LinkedIn header, on other social media profiles and in your bio. If people hear it enough, they will begin to buy into it. Branding is about leaving an imprint, and if you can articulate what you do well — keeping it to three to seven words –and have it visible, you'll be more memorable.

Build a stellar reputation and leverage it to bolster your brand.

Reputations aren't built overnight. They are built through consistent and memorable impressions. When networking, provide value to others instead of pitching your product. Make referrals to help people grow their business or offer valuable insights without charging for them. This makes you more endearing and trustworthy and builds relational equity — all adding to your reputation.

Overcome brand skepticism.

When a brand has taken a hit, rehabilitation can be difficult, but a likable and trusted face personalizes it. Instead of traditional reputation management practices, think about taking the offensive by showing key leaders participating in community service work or listening sessions with customers. Faceless organizations are easy to turn into piñatas. However, when you see leaders demonstrating care, these brands become more human.

The investment of your time in strategizing and executing your CEO brand can have a great impact on your company and, from my perspective, it is one of the most beneficial things you can do for its future.

Building a CEO brand can help drive top-line revenue, develop a more portable brand to use in launching new divisions (or a new company) and build a legacy. While all this advice sounds good in theory, unless it’s carried out in the real world, it holds no value. Below are examples of how successful CEOs are effectively using CEO branding and tips for how you can leverage these strategies for your own brand.

Conquer your industry without traditional advertising.

Specific strategies can be applied to gain exposure that's more cost-effective than traditional advertising. One way to do this is to utilize thought leadership-based public relations. Realize your audience is looking for you to provide value, and offer useful data and considerations for those in and connected to your industry.

Ascendant Group receives Corporate Brand Strategy Firm of the Year & Award for Excellence in CEO Branding – USA from Lawyer International

After over 42,000 votes cast, Ascendant Group was awarded the above achievement for excellence in what it does best: Executive Branding.

Corporate Brand Strategy Firm of the Year & Award for Excellence in CEO Branding

By winning a Global Award – 2018 Edition from Lawyer International, Ascendant Group, experts in corporate branding and CEO branding, is being recognized as a business that shines in this category, going above and beyond to provide value for their clients.

As Lawyer International States: “The winners, quite simply, represent those firms and individuals that are instrumental to the businesses that engage them, thus ensuring a swift, positive outcome is always achieved. These firms and individuals continually go above and beyond, always providing a high degree of demonstrable evidence which is consistent with positive comments from both clients and peers.”

What does Ascendant Group do that garners the above recognition?
Since 2004, inspired by trust and built on referrals, Ascendant Group specializes in CEO branding and has delivered significant results for a variety of corporations. Ascendant does that by developing an integrated brand strategy and employing a mix of media outreach, strategic social media, leveraging the likes of LinkedIn, offering award winning design work, securing awards, and even getting book deals with national publishers for their exclusive clientele. We have also helped broker strategic alliances, producing signature events and negotiating a book deal.

Raoul Davis, CEO of Ascendant Group, explains: “A strong CEO brand in today’s society helps to give emotional staying power to the company in a time when it is harder to differentiate a company’s services or product than ever before amongst the crowd of similar products, fast followers, and even those who will clone quickly. They want to give their business to a company with a great reputation… and that reputation begins with the person in charge.”

With offices in Newark and Wilmington, Delaware, Cairo, Egypt, Lebanon, the Netherlands, and
Nova Scotia, Canada, Ascendant Group will look to continue to be the global leader and most
integrated CEO branding firm in the world.

Contact Info

Website: http://ascendantstrategy.net/
Phone: 302.450.4494 ext 202
Email: INFO@ASCENDANTGROUPBRANDING.COM

Former Executive Vice President, Universal Studios, and Senior Vice-President, Twentieth Century Fox Films Neal Lemlein Joins the Ascendant Group

This press release was orginally distributed by ReleaseWire

With a role to enhance both the business’s global footprint while growing the firm’s Entertainment Division, The Ascendant Group welcomes Neal Lemlein as Senior Strategic Marketing Consultant

Newark, DE — (ReleaseWire) — 01/09/2018 — As Former Executive Vice President, Universal Studios and Senior Vice-President, Twentieth Century Fox Films, Neal Lemlein joins The Ascendant Group as Senior Strategic Marketing Consultant. Based on extensive experience gained from management posts at some of the most powerful media outlets in the world, Neal has made significant professional contributions in the marketing, management, entertainment, and new media categories. Two notable career highlights include Neal’s contributions to the marketing campaign of the original Star Wars film, and his success in generating over $100 million in new business revenue within the first 10 months of operation for DMB&B’s fledgling entertainment marketing practice.

Neal received his B.A. in Political Science from Tulane University and his Masters Degree in International Relations, from New York University. He has also served as Adjunct professor at The University of Southern California’s, Marshall School of Business, on both the graduate and undergraduate levels, teaching entertainment marketing. Neal is also a voting member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (The Oscars). He published his first book, “Pilot Your Career… 18 Strategies for Career Building and Navigating the Economic Downturn”, in 2009. His second, “Marketing in Crisis”, is slated for completion this Spring.

“Raoul Davis has developed a compelling business model, extremely relevant for addressing today’s biggest challenges. I look forward to collaborating with the talented Ascendant team,” said Neal Lemlein.

About Ascendant Group
Since 2004, inspired by trust and built on referrals, Ascendant Group specializes in CEO branding and has delivered significant results for a variety of corporations. Ascendant does that by developing an integrated brand strategy and employing a mix of media outreach, strategic social media, leveraging the likes of LinkedIn, offering award winning design work, securing awards, and even getting book deals with national publishers for their exclusive clientele. We have also helped broker strategic alliances, producing signature events and negotiating book deals.

Raoul Davis, CEO of Ascendant Group, explains: “A strong CEO brand in today’s society helps to give emotional staying power to the company in a time when it is harder than ever before to differentiate a company’s services or product amongst the crowd of similar products, fast followers, and even those who will clone quickly. They want to give their business to a company with a great reputation… and that reputation begins with the person in charge.”

Ascendant Group Recent Highlights in the Global Division and Publishing World

Our Global Division has been hard at work in 2017, with many new clients and leads from Egypt, Dubai, Lebanon, Europe, and Canada. With offices in Newark and Wilmington, Delaware, Indianapolis, Indiana, and Cairo, Egypt, as well as plans to continue to expand further internationally into the Netherlands, Ascendant Group will look to continue to be the global leader and most integrated CEO branding firm in the world.

Ascendant’s clients range from Fortune 500 executives, CEOs of mid-sized companies, retired athletes, and leaders of other organizations including ministries. Headed by Leticia Gomez, Ascendant Entertainment has negotiated book deals with top publishing companies such as Bethany House, a division of Baker House Publishing Group, Thomas Nelson, Harper Collins, Career Press and Penguin Random House to name a few. We continue to work with our clients until we’ve met all metrics.

Ascendant Group welcomes Neal Lemlein joining The Ascendant Group team and bringing his expertise to help grow our Entertainment Division, which includes a successful literary agency and burgeoning film and TV practice.

Contact Info:
Website: http://ascendantstrategy.net/
Phone: 302-450-4494 ext 202
Email: INFO@ASCENDANTGROUPBRANDING.COM

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